BOAS

We all know how hard it is to breathe when we have a sore throat, swollen glands and a cold, well that's what its like all the time for a dog with BOAS

What is BOAS?

BOAS stands for Brachycephalic 

We see it in breeds with short noses, whereby the normal anatomy of the airway is all squashed up instead of being spread out along a long nose.

This change in anatomy has come about through selective breeding of certain breeds, however it doesn't matter how it happened, what we have to deal with is each individual patient who is suffering.

Is BOAS really that bad?

Sadly, yes it is. 

In a young dog, the signs are often mild, but progress as they get older, along with new signs developing too.

The common early issues with BOAS are:

1. Narrow nostrils

2. Too much tissue (soft palate) at the back of the mouth

3. oversized tongue

4. Thick soft palate

5. Hypoplastic trachea

6. Differently shaped skull

All of these factors contribute to the difficulty of getting air into the lungs. 

Can BOAS Surgery Cure my Dog?

BOAS stands for Brachycephalic 

We see it in breeds with short noses

© WoodhamLaneVets October 2020

  • Facebook - Grey Circle